Winter Landscaping Projects in Memphis

This past week, Jackson Roofing Solutions has seen wind chills in the single digits, so we know that landscaping is probably the last thing on your mind! But if you’re starting to feel a little bit of cabin fever set in, there are plenty of winter landscaping projects you can take on to prepare for the warmer months ahead. From general lawn care to elements of design, we’ve put together a handful of ideas you can implement now to give you a healthier yard once the flowers and showers of spring show up.

memphis landscape midsouth landscaping winter landscapeRemove Leaves and Debris

Here in the MidSouth, we’re blessed with an abundance of beautiful trees. But with that beauty comes a whole lot of leaves falling once fall arrives! A lawn that’s covered in leaves, sticks, and other debris will keep the vulnerable grass blades below from receiving the sunlight they need. This can cause problems with your lawn’s overall growth and health.

Taking a few hours every weekend to rake up and remove leaves and debris will keep your lawn from becoming dull, brown, and patchy. As an added bonus, you’ll get yourself some fresh air and some much needed vitamin D!

Trim Trees and Shrubs

If you have any hostas, peonies, or daisies hanging out around your porch or your yard, you might consider trimming them now. These kinds of perennial plants do well when they’re pruned in the dormant months of winter. Winter is also a great time to prune your shrubs and hedges, as well as evergreen and deciduous trees.

Be sure you’re pruning your trees properly, though. Inspect any trees beforehand and observe all safety precautions. If the tree is especially large, or the branches are in an awkward spot, we recommended you hire a professional.

Mulching

Adding mulch earlier in the winter will help shield the ground from the season’s cold winds. Clear your planting beds of leaves and any other debris, then spread the mulch down about 1.5-2 inches thick. Take care to not place the mulch too close to the trunk of the shrub, tree, or plant, though, as this can trap moisture and cause rotting.

Protect Early Blooming Flowers

There are some plants that tend to bloom earlier in the year, such as rhododendrons, poppies, camellias, and daphne. Memphis is known for its cold snaps well into March, so if you’re worried about these types of flowers staying warm through our weird weather, stake them for stability and then cover them with burlap for warmth. This will keep them toasty warm until the true sunny springtime days return!

Add Exciting Features

Let’s face it, just about everybody’s yard looks a little sad and empty over the winter. Combat those boring blues by adding a pop of color with details or some sculptural eye candy! To keep your lawn from looking bleak and barren in the dead of winter, you’ll want to choose elements that aren’t living, and are therefore not susceptible to the cold.  Walkways, water features, sculptures, and seating can brighten your garden without relying on sunshine or warmth.

If you’d prefer to keep it natural, plant an evergreen trees or shrubs with berries to add some color and vibrancy to the yard. Doing this early in the season using a hardy specimen will give you the best results.

Winter landscaping projects with Memphis Landscape

While these winter landscaping projects are easy enough for the most amateur garden enthusiast to handle, remember that Memphis Landscape has highly trained experts that are great at making your lawn and garden look their best. We don’t focus only on what you can see today, but on all the details that decide how your landscape will look in the future!

If you’re looking to get a head start on your spring landscaping, get in touch with our team today to discuss what we can do for you. With a customized landscape plan that factors in your specific goals and your budget, we look forward to working with you and your vision!

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